Copyrighted image must credit Mick Richards on all uses.

Myth & Marvel (1-24 December 2016)

Media Release

Onespace’s second exhibition profiles recent work by celebrated Torres Strait Islander artist Brian Robinson. It is also Robinson’s first ever solo show in Brisbane.

Robinson’s exhibition, Myth & Marvel, a series of dramatic linocut prints, describes the unique cultural fusion in which he works. This lively and imaginative aesthetic has marked Robinson’s mature artistry, which combines mythology from all over the world with Marvel super heroes. It is compelling viewing, dark, exuberant and alive. Its undercurrent is suggestive that, in a period of division, peoples all over the world share more than they don’t. Eclectic sources render the power of popular culture a curious equal to that of the traditional legends that have defined us.

These linocuts combine his two dominant themes. In Lineage of Forefathers, a skull that refers to the head-hunting practices of his Torres Strait Islander ancestors is cradled in the hand of a Thor style superhero. In another, You will travel in a land of Marvels, cupid emerges from Torres Strait Islander patterns, looping the Superman motif to other stylised Marvel and DC symbols.

He says, “I draw on mythology worldwide and make parallels that cross different cultures. Objects and themes from Torres Strait myths are mixed with other well-known narratives, and legends like the Noah’s Ark and the great floods, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and Adam and Eve. These works were made from 2011 to the present, and include new works that haven’t been seen outside of Cairns.”

Ever since he was a boy – sitting in a Catholic church, looking around at biblical narratives – an interest in the Western art historical tradition has driven his aesthetic explorations. Influences as varied as comics, toys and popular culture, are visible, combined through his, “weird and wonderful imagination… I’m just a big kid really”.

One of the most influential artists of his generation, important international recognition has come in 2016 with his spectacular Malu Githalayl (colourful patterned giant crabs) installed on the exterior of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco as part of the major exhibition, Our AUSTRALIA: Defending the Oceans at the Heart of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Art (March-September 2016). Also in the world view is Robinson’s monumental six metre by eleven metre Citizens Gateway (currently under development), which will be at the heart of a project for the newly formed global social movement, Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef. To be sited on the Cairns Esplanade, this major public sculpture will acknowledge the cultural and environmental importance of the reef with a global audience.

It has been an electrifying finale to his stellar 2016. Robinson said, “It is a fantastic ride I must say – and the year hasn’t ended yet… more work to ponder, concoct and create.”

A constant in Robinson’s practice is an insistence on being seen as an artist (rather than an Indigenous artist). “I absorb from the entire spectrum of visual paraphernalia that the world offers.”

Myth & Marvel is the second exhibition since Onespace Gallery opened with institutional and commercial support and acclaim on 11 November 2016. CREATIVEMOVE has represented Brian Robinson since 2012 and is delighted to continue to support his innovative practice as both an exhibiting artist and in the public art realm. Directors John Stafford and Jodie Cox said, “There are other major international opportunities in the wings for Brian Robinson. We know already that he will have an even bigger 2017.”

Louise Martin-Chew for Onespace Gallery

Brian Robinson, 'Githalai I' (rendering), 2016; © Brian Robinson and CREATIVEMOVE / © Photo: TILT Industrial Design and The Artificial

New models make gallerists creative entrepreneurs | ArtsHub Australia

In a climate where commercial galleries have been closing at a rapid rate, we look at two galleries on how they can open a new space now.

Key to opening a new gallery at a time when so many are closing, is finding new ways to structure the relationship between buyer, artist and gallery.

John Stafford and partner Jodie Cox started CREATIVEMOVE, an art consultancy that specializes in public art and working with the government and business sectors. This month they are opening Onespace, a new shopfront in the hipster location of Brisbane suburb, West End.

Cox and Stafford aim to turn the gallery model slightly on its head with a space that is not quite commercial gallery, not an artist-run-space and sitting shy of an experimental hub.

‘Our economic model isn’t predicated on that I am a gallery and you are a collector. That binary is under such strain,’ said John Stafford. ‘We just think there are other ways of doing it.’

Onespace aims to build on the axis of public art, design and fashion, and hopes to be a bit of a landing pad for artists from more remote locations in Northern Queensland.

‘There is lots of good art outside our capitals but they just don’t have that entry point. We want to think of Onespace as a possible portal,’ said Stafford.

Onespace is positioned within walking distance to Brisbane’s Southbank cultural heavyweights, Queensland College of Art and Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA).

‘This catchment area is really significant. It also requires standards from us,’ said Stafford.

To coincide with GOMAs tenth anniversary celebrations they will show Cairns artist Brian Robinson, an artist CREATIVEMOVE took to Monaco.

NEW FUNDING MODELS

Another space soon to open is Nth Gallery in the Melbourne suburb of North Fitzroy. It also has gone the non-traditional path, turning to crowdfunding to garner support for a model that is about creating affordable space for artists..

Its founders, artists Russell Dammers, Matthew Engert and Fumikazu Kubota are studio-mates at J-Studios, a not-for-profit art space also in North Fitzroy. They intend to create a new white cube for experimentation in a disused school science laboratory.

‘There just isn’t enough affordable gallery space, so we’re doing something about it,’ said Dammers.

Nth will not charge emerging artists and curators to exhibit and will not take commissions on works sold.

Dammers, Engert and Kubota are determined to create a new ARI model, one that nurtures the careers of emerging artists and curators by providing a world-class exhibition space absolutely free of charge.

To do so they have kicked off a crowdfunding campaign on Indigogo in preparation for the grand opening in February 2017.  Any excess donations beyond the targeted $7,500 – raised by the 16 October deadline – will go to inaugural exhibitors.

Like Nth. Onespace is moving into an area that is intersects with design and innovation.

‘Onespace is a space designed for innovation within the evolving arts economy,’ explained Cox.

‘We aim to stimulate an entrepreneurial conversation between like-minded and diverse practitioners, and moves between gallery practice, public space and other platforms’ Stafford added.

Like Nth. It will also be available to artists, curators and designers to make proposals, and hire fees will be negotiable and wont follow a traditional model.

‘The area that we are in hasn’t got a big network of galleries. It has a couple of ARIs and is a growing area and that ‘new wave’ could help support what we do, and visa versa,’ said Cox.

TAKING THE RISK

The people prepared to try these new models understand that what they are doing is risky.

‘I don’t think we would be doing this if we were risk adverse. Risk should be part of the arts and we have to embrace it and to continue to play in this space.’

Stafford likened risk in the arts to jelly wrestling. ‘It is really hard to nail it down. Risk is part of what Australians do well.

‘You have to keep that stretch going – sometimes it is good and sometimes it is provocative. You can’t always predict it and which angle it is coming from. To be dynamic and flexible is the model you have to be today,’ said Stafford.

He noted that the sector recognizes that it is under a lot of stress and that the traditional government program is being disrupted, both from within and outside.

‘There are certainly some parallel opportunity that come with that disruption, and we are hoping to jump on some of those,’ he said.

‘To remain sustainable you have to embrace diversity. We couldn’t expect to succeed on one model alone. I don’t think it is easy.’

Stafford said that the character that captures Brisbane’s art scene is that there has been a consistency of experimental spaces and ARIs, lead by the Institute of Modern Art (IMA).

‘You could think of Brisbane as the “green shoot capital” – that young, vibrancy is what keeps driving this art scene forward,’ he said.

It is also what is driving Nth’s model in Fitzroy.

Onespace

13a Gladstone Road, Highgate Hill

www.onespacegallery.com.au

Opens 11 November 2016

Nth
nthari.space
111 Holden St, North Fitzroy

FIRST PUBLISHED ON FRIDAY 11 NOVEMBER, 2016

GINA FAIRLEY

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Gina Fairley covers the Visual Arts nationally for ArtsHub. Based in Sydney you can follow her on Twitter @ginafairley and Instagram at fairleygina.

Image: Brian Robinson, ‘Githalai I’ (rendering), 2016; © Brian Robinson and CREATIVEMOVE / © Photo: TILT Industrial Design and The Artificial

sebastian-moody-the-magician

the writing on the wall (11-26 November 2016)

Media Release

Sebastian Moody is under-recognised, but destined to occupy a significant place in the contemporary Australian lexicon. Moody is not constrained by a gallery space, a particular medium, concept or even language, but utilises all of these to present his work.

Wit and language have been harnessed in his seminal public art projects, notably at Brisbane International Airport departure gates – KEEP THE SUNSHINE – and on Fortitude Valley’s McLachlan Street – THE MORE I THINK ABOUT IT THE BIGGER IT GETS. Orchestrating the currency of now and writing it on the wall is his raison d’etre.

It is fitting in this context that THE MAGICIAN is the inaugural exhibition at Onepsace Gallery in Brisbane’s Highgate Hill, a new initiative from respected art consultants CREATIVE MOVE. Onespace will showcase contemporary art and design, with exhibitions embracing gallery practice and extending into investigations into the public domain. This mixed model gallery will present, invite, curate, and collaborate on exhibitions.

In Moody’s new work – paintings on hardboard and vinyl text on the wall – he continues to extend the boundaries. As paintings, they speak to the hand-made but are formed from letters into words, then phrases, in a way that suggests advertising slogans. His highly selective words, which evoke the concrete poets, with their ambiguity and multiple meanings, prompt us to “think about looking”, not just about what we think – but why.

The way that Moody constructs his art depends on his chosen medium. What unites his oeuvre is an interest in meaning, how this might shift between concept and delivery, and change at every viewing. As individuals, what we see and understand is inherently slippery: our perception of an image, a situation or a concept is dependent on our experiences, mood, time of day, culture and habit.

These new paintings conceptualise art itself as the magician. Artifice is coupled to language, with its filters – cultural, physical and optical illusion – given faintly sinister overtones by the digital surveillance to which society is now subject. Unpicking these works poses questions to this moment in time, with meaning in constant transition.

Louise Martin-Chew for Onespace Gallery

Photo: Mick Richards

Onespace Launches | West End Magazine

Onespace is a new initiative developed by art consultancy CREATIVEMOVE and its directors, John Stafford and Jodie Cox.

It represents a mixed-model style of gallery – an innovative space designed to showcase the evolving arts economy in Brisbane. It will present exhibition of artists represented by Onespace, curate exhibitions around thematic issues, invite independents curators to present exhibitions, and collaborate with artist to present their own work.

“Our program embraces a dialogue between gallery practice and investigations into public space and platforms. We aim to stimulate an entrepreneurial conversation between like-minded and diverse practitioners,” explains John.

Onespace is situated in Highgate Hill, at the city end of Gladstone Road with proximity to South Bank and Brisbane’s cultural heavyweights, Queensland College of Art and Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art.

The gallery will be launched on Friday, 11 November, with an exhibition of new work by Sebastian Moody.

Sebastian Moody is destined to occupy a significant place in the contemporary Australian lexicon. He is not constrained by a gallery space, a particular medium, concept or even language, but instead utilises all of these to present his work.

Wit and language have been harnessed in his seminal public art projects, notably at Brisbane International Airport departure gates – KEEP THE SUNSHINE – and on Fortitude Valley’s McLachlan Street – THE MORE I THINK ABOUT IT THE BIGGER IT GETS. Orchestrating the currency of now and writing it on the wall is his raison d’etre.

In Moody’s new work, THE MAGICIAN – paintings on hardboard and vinyl text on the wall – he continues to extend the boundaries. His highly selective words, with their ambiguity and multiple meanings, prompt us to ‘think about looking’, not just about what we think, but why. The way that Moody constructs his art depends on his chosen medium. What unites his oeuvre is an interest in meaning, how this might shift between concept and delivery, and change at every viewing. He believes, as individuals, what we see and understand is inherently slippery – our perception of an image, a situation or a concept is dependent on our experiences, mood, time of day, culture and habit.

THE MAGICIAN will be on display at Onespace until Saturday, 26 November.

Original story posted by West End Magazine, published on November 9 2016.

Words by Gabrielle Vacher
Images supplied by Sebastian Moody and Mick Richards

onespace-shopfront

Announcement – a new gallery for Brisbane

Onespace is a new Brisbane shopfront that will showcase contemporary art and design. It is an innovative gallery initiative developed by art consultancy CREATIVEMOVE and its directors, John Stafford and Jodie Cox.

“Our program embraces a dialogue between gallery practice and investigations into public space and platforms. We aim to stimulate an entrepreneurial conversation between like-minded and diverse practitioners.” John Stafford and Jodie Cox.

As such, Onespace represents a different style of gallery, a space designed for innovation within the evolving arts economy.

Onespace will be launched on Friday, 11 November, with an exhibition of new work by Sebastian Moody.

Onespace enjoys an enviable location in hipster West End, at the city end of Gladstone Road with proximity to South Bank and Brisbane’s cultural heavyweights (notably Queensland College of Art, and Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art).

Onespace is a mixed model gallery. It will:

  • Present exhibitions of artists represented by Onespace
  • Curate exhibitions around thematic issues
  • Invite other independent curators to present exhibitions
  • Collaborate with artists to present their own work

Interested artists and curators are invited to contact Onespace to discuss a proposition or idea.